stuff we drool about

Sidetracked Magazine

Sidetracked started as a website created by web designer John Summerton as an escape from his freelance work, it has featured many tales of extreme adventure from incredible expeditions all around the world. Recently, Sidetracked has made a transition to print (now in its fourth volume) and this unique journal showcases a series of breathtaking extreme travel tales, in which extraordinary people push themselves well beyond the realm of the everyday. The magazine´s stunning imagery provides a unique glimpse into the life of an adventurer, and lets you live vicariously through each journal entry.



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Taylor Stitch
Huckberry Interior
MINIPRESSO | Image

MINIPRESSO

Minipresso is a beautifully designed and handy portable espresso machine. The hand-powered device lets you prepare on-the-go, amazing coffee with a quality close to a traditional machine. Simply scoop up your favorite coffee, fill the chamber with hot water, and with the help of the hand operated semi-automatic piston, start pumping at will to control the amount of extracted coffee into the integrated cup. via watch the video Minipresso will retail for $49 ...
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HOW MUSIC GOT FREE | Image

HOW MUSIC GOT FREE

Named one of Time magazine’s best books of 2015 so far, How Music Got Free is a story about greed, friendship, genius, stupidity and music piracy. In the gripping book, author Stephen Witt tells the fascinating story of pirated music, from the German audio engineers who invented the mp3, to the story of Dell Glover, a worker in a compact-disc manufacturing plant, with access to new albums who leaked nearly 2,000 of them over the course of a decade, to the story of a...
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PARK BUTTE LOOKOUT | Image

PARK BUTTE LOOKOUT

Fire lookouts were built to house workers full time after the Great Fire of 1910 that burned millions of acres of forest in Washington, Montana, and Idaho and were used to detect fires and were used as an early warning system in an age before radios, aircraft and GPS. Thanks to modern technology, they are now obsolete for their original use but are now usually kept up by park volunteers for people to visit and stay in. Take this restored fire lookout in Mount Baker ...
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