stuff we drool about

Playa Viva Treehouse

The Playa Viva resort in Mexico offers guests an unique opportunity to stay at a treehouse suite surrounded by lush palms, with a unobstructed ocean view, and a mile-long private beach. Raised 6 feet above the ground, the 700 square feet circular treehouse is outfitted with a king-size bed, private bathroom, open-air shower, ocean view and a small lounge area with in-floor hammock. There’s also a daybed so more people can share the experience. The eco-friendly treehouse suite is made of bamboo with electricity and hot water provided by solar power.



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Taylor Stitch
Huckberry Interior
THE FOOD LAB | Image

THE FOOD LAB

The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science is a New York Times bestseller, itīs the ultimate book for nerds that cook. Ever wondered how to pan-fry a steak with a charred crust thatīs perfectly medium-rare? How to make perfect homemade mac īnī cheese? or maybe how to roast a succulent, moist turkey? The book features hundreds of easy-to-make recipes, and focuses on the science behind beloved American dishes, delving into the interactions between heat, energy,...
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AUTOCAMP | Image

AUTOCAMP

Autocamp takes glamping to a whole new level, it offers guests a chance to stay in one of their many custom Airstream trailers, or in a luxurious canvas tent with plush, modern interiors. Recently opened, the new campsite is located in a native Redwood forest, an hour and a half away from San Francisco and very close to the banks of the Russian River. The Airstreams have their own spa-inspired bathrooms with walk in showers and big tubs, whilst the guests staying at...
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PARK BUTTE LOOKOUT | Image

PARK BUTTE LOOKOUT

Fire lookouts were built to house workers full time after the Great Fire of 1910 that burned millions of acres of forest in Washington, Montana, and Idaho and were used to detect fires and were used as an early warning system in an age before radios, aircraft and GPS. Thanks to modern technology, they are now obsolete for their original use but are now usually kept up by park volunteers for people to visit and stay in. Take this restored fire lookout in Mount Baker ...
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