stuff we drool about

Eva Solo Tea Bag

For fans of the typically British habit of tea drinking comes this new product from Eva Solo. The Eva Solo Tea Bag was inspired by the regular paper tea bags, so it looks like them but itīs made from stainless steel, so you can use it over and over. It comes in two sizes, with capacities of 10 or 15 grams of brewing tea leaves. On the bottom you get a silicone cover, to fill it with the tea of your choice and make sure you donīt mess up your nice teapotīs bottom surface. This Scandinavian design piece will surely come in handy lots of times, itīs also green because itīs helping to reduce paper waste plus itīll look good on any teapot youīll set it on to.

Available for purchase in Europe here




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