stuff we drool about

Soarigami Armrest Divider

Soarigami is a genius way to stop airplane armrest battles for good, a folding device that extends and divides the paltry elbow room of your shared airplane armrest! Simply unfold it, clamp it over an existing armrest, and the device will create two armrests instead of just one to fight over. Ideal for frequent flyers, Soarigami sets out to make armrest sharing an elbow-fighting-free zone. Made of recycled plastic, it folds flat for easy carry when it’s not being used. 



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T-TOP ROOF TENTS | BY EEZI-AWN | Image

T-TOP ROOF TENTS | BY EEZI-AWN

If you like jeep adventures and camping, you must know of the hazards of camping in the wild. South African company EEzi-Awn sure knows about the hazards they been making roof-top tents for 25 years. By camping on your jeepīs roof-top you will keep safe from wildlife, insects, and avoid damp terrain when it rains....
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LAUNCHPAD MINI | BY NOVATION | Image

LAUNCHPAD MINI | BY NOVATION

Novation have recently released the Launchpad Mini controller, a shrunk down version of their biggest hit, the Launchpad. Portability was the number-one priority, and this new miniature version is aimed at the "iPad generation”, it is powered straight from your iPad or computer, no power supply required. It is compatible with Novationīs Launchpad app as well as Mac/PC installs of Ableton Live and FL Studio. Compact, rugged and lightweight the Launchpad Mini is built...
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PARK BUTTE LOOKOUT | Image

PARK BUTTE LOOKOUT

Fire lookouts were built to house workers full time after the Great Fire of 1910 that burned millions of acres of forest in Washington, Montana, and Idaho and were used to detect fires and were used as an early warning system in an age before radios, aircraft and GPS. Thanks to modern technology, they are now obsolete for their original use but are now usually kept up by park volunteers for people to visit and stay in. Take this restored fire lookout in Mount Baker ...
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